Experimenting in UE4

As a result of learning the basics of modelling, it became feasible to start creating things in Unreal Engine 4.
Since I had a texture set already made for a clean modernist style, I decided to test with that, I ended up greatly modifying the set however.

Hallway view

Hallway view

Wireframe

Wireframe

Unreal’s material editor gives you some powerful tools, such as creating procedural specular, this helps to hide texture tiling

hrs22_specularbuffer

Specular view

The visual style is heavily inspired from Mirror’s Edge, very saturated pallets with most detail in the normalmap, specular, and now roughness;  The color itself is bright, and tone is derived from other materials (such as dark tile or marble).  Color bleeds and gives the lighting “weight” in the world.

I’ve always liked the aesthetic, it’s so simple to do, yet produces such complex and vivid spaces, not quite real, but not quite fake.

hrs0015

Office 1

Office 1

Wireframe

Wireframe

I’m still not a fan of how UVing and texturing work in the engine, but I’m sure it’s just a workflow problem, and I’ll get used to it in time.

 


 

Some work on a low-poly light fixture:

Lit

Lit

Unlit

Unlit

 

Since it’s not going to be viewed up close, it doesn’t have a normalmap, and is mostly flat-shaded to fit it’s style.  I baked out an Emissive map from Blender with Cycles, the whole thing uses 2 DXT1 texture.  But if I was aiming for efficiency I would have 1/4’d the resolution, put the AO in red, the emissive in green, and imported it uncompressed.

Small light fixture used to create contrast

 

hrs029hrs030

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This one is actually hard surface modeled, thought it really didn’t need to be.

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I used a static IES-textured spot light below it to give it a better defined light cone.

 

 

And that’s mostly it, basic scene held together with duct-tape, low poly objects, and some fancy materials.

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